Ralph Stanley and His Clinch Mountain Boys

Although he needs no introduction, we’ll go ahead and give him one anyway. Ralph was born in Dickenson County, Virginia, where he still resides when he’s not on the road. After 55 years in the business, he’s still the best banjo picker and tenor singer in bluegrass music. As a recording artist, he has performed on more than 170 albums, tapes, and CDs. He’s also written many songs himself and with his brother, the late Carter Stanley. Ralph’s played throughout the United States and in many foreign lands, too, including several tours of Japan. In addition to the many honors Ralph has received as a bluegrass musician, including membership on the Grand Ole Opry. He also has one of the finest bands on the bluegrass circuit.

Los Straitjackets

When members of the Los Straitjackets say their new record, The Further Adventures of the Los Straitjackets, is ‘all over the place,’ they certainly mean it. From the raunchy romp of album opener ‘Cal Speed,’ the hand clap boogie of ‘Fortune Cookie,’ the woozy vibrato of ‘Catalina’ and on through to the flirtatious whimsy of ‘Noctural Twist’ – loosely inspired by the 1930s-era jazz standard ‘Harlem Nocturne’ – the new record is a return to form for the band. After spending the last couple of years making records with Kaiser George (Twist Party) and Cesar Rosas of Los Lobos, rockabilly belter Big Sandy, and East L.A. legend Little Willie G. (Rock En Espanol Vol. 1) the band found itself missing doing what it does best – and that’s making straight up instrumental rock and roll. ‘It’s definitely heavier – more garage-y than our other records,’ says guitarist Danny Amis. ‘It’s definitely a little more of a punk record than before. I think it’s reflective of the fact that we needed to get back to that.’ To write and record the new album – its first record of original instrumentals since 2003’s Supersonic Guitars in 3-D – the band spent a lot of time listening to its heroes, including Link Wray, and the Ventures. In addition to those artists, guitarist Eddie Angel listened to other bands that may be less likely to be associated with the Los Straitjackets, including Led Zeppelin and The Cramps. He described the process of listening to records for inspiration adding, ‘Then we drank a lot of scotch, also for inspiration.’ ‘We never try to be meaningful,’ Angel says. ‘We’re an anecdote to that. Our goal is to bring fun to the party.’

Joe Louis Walker

One of the most fiery guitar players on the planet. His stinging tone and soulful voice make Joe the preeminent bluesman on the scene today. He was recently nominated for 5 awards at the 31st Blues Music Awards

Miss Tess and the Bon Ton Parade

Critics have had a hard time assigning Tess’s music to a specific genre; when she still lived in Boston she won a Boston Music Award for ‘Outstanding Folk Artist of the Year’ (2008), in 2009 she received a nomination for ‘Best Jazz Act’, and in 2010 was nominated for ‘Best Roots Act’ by the Boston Phoenix. Miss Tess & The Bon Ton Parade not only played in most venues in Boston, but are also hardened road warriors who have found homes in all types of venues ranging from upscale jazz clubs, music festivals, to local dive bars. Darling, oh Darling, the fifth release from Miss Tess, shows the performing artist and songwriter transcending the retro-label often appended to her music in the past. Although the music maintains a certain feeling of nostalgia, upon a few listens one will find unique personality and a fresh approach in these original compositions. The new album makes use of varied instrumentation including country-tinged pedal steel, a three part horn section, barroom piano, and a lonesome banjo. Miss Tess says about the compositions, ‘I wanted each song to be recorded like I heard it in my head, whether or not we had those instruments in the regular performing band’. The album, as well as the stage show for that matter, is interspersed with up-tempo playful ditties, mournful love songs, and offbeat charmers.

An Acoustic Evening with Ian Hunter and Friends

Truly one of the iconic figures in rock and roll history. As the leader of the legendary Mott the Hoople to his prolific solo career, Ian has carried the torch of rock and roll greatness . At this show, Ian will be accompanied by Andy York and Steve Holley. The show will be a career retrospective from his Mott days through his solo catalogue with songs from his great new record Man Overboard. This will be his only New England appearance. We are truly honored and excited to be hosting this rock and roll legend

SOLD OUT Nanci Griffith

Nanci Griffith got an early start on her path to performing and songwriting. At the age of 6 she began to write songs, thinking of it as ???¨?«part of the process of learning how to play guitar.???¨?« While she doesn???¨?«t remember many of her earliest songs, she does recall that ???¨?«the first original song my mother commented on???¨?«was a song about Timothy Leary.???¨?« Then at the age of 14, when a campfire turn at the Kerrville Folk Festival caught the ear of singer-songwriter Tom Russell, she was on her way. Having recorded 18 albums and performed concerts all over the world, it???¨?«s safe to say that she???¨?«s never looked back.

Po’ Girl

Impossible to put this band in a tidy little box’they’re equally at home in Douala, Cameroon playing the Massao World Music Festival, as they are at the International Jazz Festival in Montreal, the Winnipeg Folk Festival, the Woodford Music Festival in Australia or just playing for fun for the people in Vondel Park, Amsterdam. Suffice to say Po’Girl makes 21st Century roots music, urban roots ‘ never derivative, not faithfully aping a beloved tradition. Russell, Teixeira, Sidelinger, and August don’t re-hash the old forms, they reshape and reinvigorate them for new ears. Like genuine gypsies, they wander and play – out on the international road bringing their unique brand of pan North Americana to a widespread audience 250 to 300 days of the year’ Always restless, more often than not bone-tired, they write their flashes of sadness, their loss, their good love, their faint dreams of home into songs that matter deeply to them. Like any good art, they are little acts of self-rescue. So you should listen. You aren’t much different from them, and who couldn’t use a little rescuing these days?