DeBlois Gallery Member Artists’ Exhibition

DeBlois Gallery, a non-profit artists’ co-operative, is a cornerstone of art life in Newport, RI. As the oldest co-operative in the city, DeBlois has hosted hundred of shows for the art community, featuring the work of well over 2700 artists from throughout southern New England. Many emerging artists, having debuted at DeBlois, have gone on to enjoy wide acceptance and recognition, burnishing DeBlois’ well-earned reputation as a contemporary gallery that encourages risk-taking and innovation.
Participating Artists:
Kathleen Armor
Ronald Caplain
Izabella Casselman
Valerie Debrule
Michael S. Guertin
Lisa May
Daniel McManus
Kathleen Morton
Karen Nash
Jonathan Small
Felicia Touhey
Marion Wilner

Closing reception is Saturday, August 31st from 2:00 – 4:00 p.m. The public is cordially invited. Admission is free.

Image: ‘Illumination’ Kathy Armor

Poor Old Shine and Heather Maloney

From their handpainted cereal box cd cases to their thoughtful arrangements, Poor Old Shine, a Roots/Americana band from Storrs, CT is about honesty and hand crafted creativity. It’s foot stomping, mind racing, dirty bluegrass like you’ve never heard it before! They travel with an assortment of instruments including guitars, banjos, pump organ, mandolin, string bass, musical saw, washboard, and a yard-sale-scrap-metal drum set. It’s old songs with a new feel, banjos with paint peeled, shoes with holes and treadless soles, and music that is real. The music is rooted in the folk and Appalachian mountain music tradition and fits in well at bluegrass festivals and sticky rock clubs alike. They have been compared to The Avett Brothers, Mumford and Sons, Langhorne Slim, and The Low Anthem because of the changing instrumentation and harmonies. Each set mixes the band’s modern songwriting with traditional folk ballads, prison work songs, and front porch style jamming. ‘I always said that if I didn’t write songs, I’d be covered in tattoos, because every song I write is something I want to remember really badly.’ says Heather Maloney. She has no ink so far. Instead, the Northampton, Mass., singer and songwriter is marking life lessons with music on her new self-titled album, penning tuneful reminders to herself about the little triumphs of love on ‘Flutter,’ the solace of redemption on ‘Turn Yourself Around’ and her firm belief that nothing’s colder than trying too hard to be cool, an idea that inspired ‘Fire for You.’ Heather Maloney, out in March on Signature Sounds, is the third album for a songwriter hailed by The Huffington Post for ‘lyrics that cut to the chase.’ DigBoston wrote that she ‘deserves the type of cult following that has allowed the likes of Aimee Mann and Ani DiFranco that long standing success and influence they have had.’

NRBQ

Terry Adams, visionary, driving force, and ‘untamed genius of the keyboards’ for NRBQ since the band’s inception over four decades ago, is one of music’s true originals. Adams reignited the legendary Quartet with the addition of Scott Ligon on guitar & vocals, Conrad Choucroun on drums, and newest band member Casey McDonough on bass & vocals. The 2011 NRBQ studio album, Keep This Love Goin’ and the 2012 live CD We Travel the Spaceways show the NRBQ magic – great musicianship, emotion, fearlessness, and fun ‘ is intact. ‘Ability to groove like no other band on the planet,’ says popmatters.com. ‘Fans will find spontaneity, humor, breadth, and musical know-how” says No Depression. ‘Music no one can make anymore.’ says the Detroit Metro-Times. And live? ”the current incarnation lived up to the legacy. They reclaimed not only the vast NRBQ catalog of songs and loose-as-a-goose sound, but also the band’s wildly unpredictable spirit on stage. Their willingness to step way out on a limb has always been one of NRBQ’s most endearing qualities, and in the contemporary world of pre-packaged, cookie-cutter pop stars, it’s sure great to have them back,’ said the Albany Times-Union. Added the Minneapolis Star-Tribune, ‘Meet the new Q, as fun as the old Q. NRBQ is still liable to play anything. Roaring rockabilly, transcendent pop-rock, roadhouse blues, avant jazz ‘ you name it, Adams claims it and reframes it. The new band is a revelation, capable of playing nearly the whole NRBQ catalog, which dates back to 1966.’

Wednesday August 28 Bela Fleck and Abigail Washburn

Tomorrow night Wednesday August 28, in a rare duo performance Bela Fleck and Abigail Washburn. Two great musicians at the top of their craft. Tickets still available.
Here is a great video of Bela and Abigail to get you psyched for the show. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aRwblm_dtVY

SOLD OUT Leon Redbone

Over the course of his 30+ year, 15+ album career, Leon Redbone has continued his love affair with tunes from the turn-of-the-century (as in the second-to-last century), flapper-era radio ditties, Depression-spawned ragtime and World War II folk-jazz. Redbone’s career first gained momentum in the early ’70s when Bob Dylan sought him out at the Mariposa Folk Festival. Most folks were introduced to the man during his network debut on Saturday Night Live in 1976, where he showcased his indelible version of ‘Walkin’ Stick.’ In a year typified by amplified arena rock, Redbone’s intimate, low-key delivery proved to be a jolting antonym. Since then the opportunities for this unlikely figure to impose himself on pop culture have been plentiful. He appeared as a wise, animated snowman opposite Will Ferrell in the $173 million-grossing comedy ‘Elf’. His duet with star Zooey Deschanel on the seasonal standard ‘Baby, It’s Cold Outside’ served as the picture’s theme song. Over the years, Redbone has also provided TV title tunes to Mr. Belvedere and Harry and the Hendersons, and had a memorable guest role as a quixotic, guitar-wielding guardian to the character Corky on ABC’s critically acclaimed series Life Goes On. New York choreographer Eliot Feld recently created the ballets Mr. XYZ (featuring Mikhail Baryshnikov) and Paper Tiger, which were woven around Redbone’s signature songs. If there is one common element to Redbone’s diverse music it’s his mastery of his acoustic guitar. It is easy to get lost in his stage exploits (which often gravitate between vaudeville and performance art) and overlook what a truly fine player he is ‘ fingerpicking with a ragtime bounce or jumping between chords with the grace of a hurdler. (Maybe the analogy should be with the grace of a card shark, because he makes it look so effortless it can often be deceiving.)

Red Molly

Red Molly consistently brings concert-goers to their feet with stunning three-part harmonies, crisp musicianship and a warm, engaging stage presence. They have earned a devoted and ever-widening fan base, and have begun to tour nationally. Laurie MacAllister, Abbie Gardner and Carolann Solebello have a lot of fun on stage, and it’s contagious. The Boston Globe says: ‘Everything Red Molly sings is delivered with tick-tight arrangements, crystalline vocals, and caramel harmonies. But what is most striking is the ardor they bring to everything they do, whether snuggling into the sweet parochialism of an old spiritual, or the gritty pathos of a Gillian Welch tune. They come on less like stars strutting for their minions than pals.

Spindle City Americana Music Festival featuring the Music of Elvis Costello

This is the 2nd year of this fun event. Artists scheduled to play are Smith and Weedon, Todd Thibaud, Jimmy Ryan, Heather Maloney, Mark Cutler and the Men of Great Courage, Jenny Dee and the Deliquents, and Bob Kendall Band. Each act will play an Elvis Costello song chosen by the Narrows and one they chose themselves. They will fill out their sets with some original material as well. This event will run from 5-11 pm.

David Bromberg Band

He’s played with everyone, he’s toured everywhere, he can lead a raucous big band or hold an audience silent with a solo acoustic blues. Here’s the story of David Bromberg, or at least some of it . . . Born in Philadelphia in 1945 and raised in Tarrytown, NY, ‘as a kid I listened to rock ‘n’ roll and whatever else was on the radio,’ says Bromberg. ‘I discovered Pete Seeger and The Weavers and, through them, Reverend Gary Davis. I then discovered Big Bill Broonzy, who led me to Muddy Waters and the Chicago blues. This was more or less the same time I discovered Flatt and Scruggs, which led to Bill Monroe and Doc Watson.’ Bromberg began studying guitar-playing when he was 13 and eventually enrolled in Columbia University as a musicology major. The call of the Greenwich Village folk scene in the mid-’60s drew David to the downtown clubs and coffeehouses, where he could watch and learn from the best performers, including primary sources such as his inspiration and teacher, the Reverend Gary Davis. Bromberg’s sensitive and versatile approach to guitar-playing earned him jobs playing the Village ‘basket houses’ for tips, the occasional paying gig, and lots of employment as a backing musician for Tom Paxton, Jerry Jeff Walker and Rosalie Sorrels, among others. He became a first-call, ‘hired gun’ guitarist for recording sessions, ultimately playing on hundreds of records by artists including Bob Dylan (New Morning, Self Portrait, Dylan), Link Wray, The Eagles, Ringo Starr, Willie Nelson, and Carly Simon. An unexpected and wildly successful solo spot at the 1970 Isle of Wight Festival in Great Britain led to a solo deal with Columbia Records, for whom David recorded four albums. His eponymous 1971 debut not only included the mock-anguished ‘Suffer to Sing the Blues,’ a Bromberg original that became an FM radio staple, but also ‘The Holdup,’ a songwriting collaboration with former Beatle George Harrison, whom he met at his manager’s Thanksgiving dinner festivities. Harrison also played slide guitar on the track. Through Bromberg’s manager, Al Aronowitz, David also met the Grateful Dead and wound up with four of their members, including Jerry Garcia, playing on his next two albums. Bromberg’s range of material, based in the folk and blues idioms, continually expanded with each new album to encompass bluegrass, ragtime, country and ethnic music, and his touring band grew apace. By the mid-’70s, the David Bromberg Big Band included horn-players, a violinist, and several multi-instrumentalists, including David himself. Among the best-known Bromberg Band graduates: mandolinist Andy Statman, later a major figure in the Klezmer music movement in America, and fiddler Jay Ungar (who wrote the memorable ‘Ashokan Farewell’ for Ken Burns’ PBS documentary, ‘The Civil War’).

SOLD OUT Nick Lowe

Nick Lowe has made his mark as a producer (Elvis Costello-Graham Parker-Pretenders-The Damned), songwriter of at least three songs you know by heart, short-lived career as a pop star, and a lengthy term as a musicians’ musician. But in his current ‘second act’ as a silver-haired, tender-hearted but sharp-tongued singer-songwriter, he has no equal. Starting with 1995’s ‘The Impossible Bird’ through to 2011’s ‘The Old Magic,’ Nick has turned out a fantastic string of albums, each one devised in his West London home, and recorded with a core of musicians who possess the same veteran savvy. Lowe brings wit and understated excellence to every performance, leading Ben Ratliff of the New York Times to describe his live show as ‘elegant and nearly devastating.’